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Problem Solving

SELECTING TINT DEPOT TO SOLVE PROBLEMS

  • The film industry for architectural windows started because of the need for solar control and energy savings. The business was built on Silver 20. It has been a workhorse of a film but overtime, consumer requirements have changed. To meet the requirements of today’s consumer you need to broaden your understanding of film choices so you can fit the customer’s requirement.

BENEFITS OF SOLAR CONTROL WINDOW FILMS

  • The primary function of solar control film is to manage energy from the sun as it passes through a window. Film changes what happens to the energy when it strikes the glass, providing multiple benefits for both the interior and exterior of the building.
  • Tint Depot solar control architectural window films provide the following benefits:
    • Block out significant amounts of solar heat energy,
    • Reducing “hot spots” around windows and glass doors, improving occupant comfort and
    • Reducing air conditioning loads along with utility bills.
    • Rejects nearly all of the damaging ultraviolet. Reducing fading of furnishings, window treatments and carpeting.
    • Increases privacy
    • Reduces glare so occupants view computer or television screens more easily
    • Improves external appearance of older buildings
    • Reduces electromagnetic interference from radio signals
  • When compared to special order performance glass, solar control window films are readily available with a wide product selection providing a variety of looks and performance levels. Window film is and can economically retrofit any window into a high performance glazing system. Tint Depot provide manufacturer owned distribution throughout the world to meet your window film needs.

CHOOSING SOLAR CONTROL WINDOW FILMS

  • After looking at an Architectural Performance Results sheet, you begin to realize that films that appear similar perform very differently on the window, some components of film may selectively block certain wavelengths. Other components block other wavelengths. It is the combination of these components that produce differences in film performance.
  • Film choice should be based on the requirements for a specific customer. In certain cases, glare or high light transmission may not be important. In another application, privacy may be the most critical need. For a storefront showroom, high visible light transmission, and low reflectivity with some solar heat rejection and high UV rejection might be the requirement.
  • The most efficient solar films are metallized films. Traditionally, maximum efficiency films have high total solar energy reflection (50%) and will have some absorption that can provide a total solar energy rejection of 70% to 80%. Often the by-product of this is low visible light transmission in the 15% to 20% range. New spectrally select films are designed to reflect high amounts of heat while transmitting higher amounts of visible light.
  • At the very least, learn to use visible light transmission, visible light reflectance, as well as shading coefficient, total solar energy rejection or solar heat gain coefficients to make informed choices to meet your customers needs.

THE TINT DEPOT LINE-UP

  • Tint Depot offers nearly 100 different window films to meet different customer needs and desires. Helping a customer choose the most appropriate film for an architectural application can seem difficult. Often a dealer sells the film he or she knows, or from the roll on the shelf. Neither of these methods ensures your customer’s long term satisfaction.
  • The question is:
    • With over 100 different films, what are the differences in films and why might one be better than another for a specific application?
  • You now understand:
    • Solar energy and heat transfer What happens when sunlight strikes glass How film is made Glass and glazing Glass breakage and insulated glass (IG) unit failure
  • Window film solves the problems that come with sunlight striking the glass Understanding the difference between films makes selling film easier. Selling from fact and knowledge brings credibility to you and your business. Up selling is simplified when you are able to build benefit upon benefit. Architectural glass customers will pay more when they understand they get mor

Non-reflective Films

  • Tint Depot non-reflective films are clear or dyed. Many non-reflective automotive films are designed to enhance the appearance of car windows. Clear safety and security films are designed to only provide protection against glass breakage or flying shards of glass. The patterned specialty films have a design printed directly on the surface, while the colored specialty films provide the opportunity for color to meet special needs.
  • Non-reflective films offer great diversity in appearance. Ultraviolet absorbers are incorporated into the construction of the non-reflective films, making ultraviolet protection part of the benefits of these films. Non-reflective films offer no measure of solar protection through reflection, but often will show performance as measured by Total Solar Energy Rejected because these films absorb energy based on their dark color. The one exception is white opaque specialty film. Both the solar and the visible light reflectance, reported on the performance results sheet, for non-reflective films are very low, except white opaque

Reflective films

  • Reflective films reflect solar energy and visible light. Tint Depot is known for their reflective films, which are manufactured by sputtering metal onto the surface of the polyester film. A variety of metals sputtered onto the surface of the film provide a variety of film appearances. A change in metal equals a change in appearance. A colored layer of film may be laminated onto the film to modify the appearance yet again.
  • Within the category of reflective film there are different levels of reflection. More metal on the film means higher performance as a result of greater reflection. The variance in reflectance is seen in the solar and visible light reflectance numbers on the Performance Rating Sheet.

ADHESIVE SYSTEM

  • Architectural solar control films are available with both pressure sensitive and clear dry adhesive to meet installer preferences. The technology behind each of these systems differs but the bottom line is that Tint Depot are known in the industry for their particularly aggressive and long-lasting adhesive systems. These well-designed adhesives ensure Tint Depot stays adhered to the glass.

Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

  • The majority of Tint Depot are available with pressure sensitive adhesives. It is important to note that all automotive films are pressure sensitive to provide immediate tack and to hold the film to curved glass surfaces. All safety and security films have pressure sensitive adhesive. These films are manufactured with a thicker, tackier adhesive. This adhesive not only holds the heavier film but more importantly, the glass adheres to the film in case of a forced break.

Clear dry adhesives

  • Clear dry adhesives (CPA) have superb optical properties. Since it is not tacky, his adhesive system makes film handling easier to for architectural applications that may require wide film cut into large pieces. This is fast becoming the preferred adhesive system for architectural solar control films in the industry for ease of handling and the time that is saved in installation. C

THICKNESS

  • Solar control film is generally 1 to 2 mils thick. It may be made up of single ply of polyester or a laminated stack of polyester depending on the performance criteria.
  • All films 4 Mils and thicker are considered safety and security films. They are all listed as safety and security films and most are available with additional solar control properties. Having solar control options available in solar safety films provides the opportunity “up-selling”. A customer who calls wanting glass breakage protection can add solar control for a small increase to the total job cost. The same is true for a customer who calls for solar control, while the job is being done they can add the protection of safety and security film.

Summer/Winter Low-Emissivity

  • Summer/Winter 25 is a window film in a class by itself. It was designed as film for climates with more heating days than cooling days. This low emissivity film reflects heat (true blackbody heat) back into the room during times of cold exterior temperatures. In addition, Summer/Winter 25 has a high total solar energy reflectance (%R) so it works as an excellent film for summer heat rejection.
  • This is one of the best window films for fade reduction because it provides excellent reduction of UV Light (%T) over the entire UV bandwidth, near Infrared energy and visible light (%T), all contributors to fading.
  • In addition, Summer/Winter 25 is an excellent choice to consider if glare control in a heating climate is a major criterion for your application.

THE PERFORMANCE RESULTS NUMBERS

  • Tint Depot offers performance results for each film manufactured. These results are derived from an actual sample measured by a UVA/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer. The wavelength data read by the spectrophotometer then is fed into various software programs to be evaluated on several factors. The final step of this process feeds the results to the Window 4.1 software program that generates all the Film Performance Results Numbers. Lawrence Berkley Labs under federal funding to standardize glass and glazing test methodologies developed the Window 4.1 program. Because the production of these numbers is standardized, it is possible for a consumer to compare various glazing options.
  • Whether you are reading shading coefficients, visible light transmission or any of the reported data, for any glazing product, the same methods have been used to calculate those numbers. This should be true for glass, laminated glass, windows, solar screens, solar shades or any product you see solar performance numbers. The product is measured with a specialized spectrophotometer and interpreted with standardized software. This allows a retrofit product like film to be compared to the highest performing, newest glass being manufactured. The way these numbers are generated brings credibility to both the performance results and to our industry as a whole.

USING THE PERFORMANCE RESULTS TO SOLVE PROBLEMS

  • Each performance result is used as an indicator of something that happens when energy strikes glass.
  • Solar Energy

– % T (Transmittance) – an indicator of how much energy is coming into the room.
– % A (Absorptance) – an indicator of how much energy is going into the glass. Absorbed energy raises glass temperature.
– % R (Reflectance) – an indicator of the amount of energy that is reflected away from the window.

  • Visible Light

– % T (Transmittance) – an indicator of how much light passes through the glass and into the room.
– % A (Absorptance) – an indicator of how much light is lost into the glass.
– Exterior % R (Reflectance) – an indicator of the amount of light that is reflected away from the window toward the outside. This as well as color is an indicator of how shiny the window will look from the outside. If the film is applied on tinted glass, that often reduces the shiny appearance of a film with a high exterior reflectance.
– Interior % R (Reflectance) – an indicator of the amount of light that is reflected from the window toward the interior of the room.

  • Emissivity – indicates the reflection of room radiant heat back into the room. It is an important indicator for cooler climates.
  • Thermal Energy

– U-Value (Summer) a measure of heat loss. Will be an indication of shielding from outdoor summer conditions. Because U-value measurement is based on the temperature difference between outdoor and indoor temperatures, summer U-Value is based on a smaller temperature difference than winter U-value
– U-Value (Winter) a measure of heat loss. Will be an indication of blocking the loss of heat through the window to the outside. Because U-value measurement is based on the temperature difference between outdoor and indoor temperatures, winter U-Value is based on a greater temperature difference than summer U-Value.

  • Shading Coefficient – an indicator of the effectiveness of window film in rejecting heat as compared to clear glass.
  • Solar Heat Gain Coefficient – an indicator of the effectiveness of window film that is used by engineers or architects and is often requested by them for the energy saving calculations. It measures the percentage of near infrared energy directly transmitted or absorbed and then re-radiated to the building.
  • UV Light % T – is an indicator of the amount of ultraviolet energy that passes through the window. Is a effective indicator of the ability of film to block the 40% of fading that is attributed to ultraviolet energy.
  • Total Solar Energy Rejected measures a film’s ability to reject solar energy. Visible light and infrared radiation energy are combined in this measurement. TSER equals the solar reflectance plus the part of solar absorption that was absorbed by the glass and radiates back into the room.
Measure When Used Better
Heat Transmittance

Absorptance

Reflectance

Visible Light Transmittance

Absorptance

Reflectance

Emissivity

Summer U-Value

Winter U-Value

Shading Coefficient

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient

Ultraviolet Light transmission

Total Solar Energy Rejection (TSER

Heat though the window

Heat absorbed by the window

Heat reflected away from window

More light through the window

Block view through the window

Reduce glare

Reduce glare

Ability to keep heat in (winter)

Heat loss through a material

Heat loss through a material

Heat coming in window

Heat coming in window

UV into the room

Heat kept out at the window

Lower

Lower

Higher

Higher

Lower

Higher

Higher

Lower

Lower

Lower

Lower

Lower

Lower

Highe

ROLL WIDTH

  • Tint Depot offers a wide variety of film widths to make installation easier. The right width film is easier to handle and avoids seams. In addition you can minimize waste when using the correct width of film.
  • Tint Depot automotive films are available in widths from 20″ to 60″ inches. Architectural films come in sizes that range from 24″ to 72″. Safety and security films come in widths form 24″ to 60″. Specialty films each come in one width with those widths varying from 36″ to 60″. The exception to this is Graffitigard which is available in both 48″ and 60″.
  • Your Tint Depot price list or service center is your source of information for which films are available in which sizes.

MAXIMIZING PERFORMANCE BY SELECTING THE RIGHT FILM

The Problem: Reduce Solar Heat Gain

  • In a building with a glass fagade, solar heat gain through the east, west and south facing windows can account for up to 80% of the air-conditioning load. When air-conditioning equipment seems insufficient to carry the cooling load it is possible that the addition of solar film can reduce the load sufficiently to prevent expensive re-engineering
  • Reducing solar energy at the window reduces the amount of heat coming through the window into interior space. Solar heat gain at the windows is one of the causes of hot spots at the perimeter of large office spaces. Generally, it is difficult to air-condition these areas without causing those people who are sitting away from the windows to be too cold. Reduction of heat gain at the windows is often becomes a comfort issue.
  • To reduce solar heat gain, choose a film that reflects as much solar energy as possible. In the performance results, look for a film with a low shading coefficient or a low solar heat gain coefficient.

Problem: Energy Costs

In cooling climates –

  •  Just as in the case of increasing comfort by reducing solar heat gain requires blocking sunlight from coming in the window, the same principle holds true for reducing energy costs. Because the greatest load on most commercial air-conditioners is from heat gain at the window, to block that heat is to reduce -run time. A reduction in run-time reduces energy costs as well as maintenance costs.
  • To reduce solar heat gain, choose a film that reflects as much solar energy as possible. In the performance results, look for a film with a low shading coefficient or a low solar heat gain coefficient. These numbers are used to determine the energy cost savings with film.

In heating climates

  • In climates with more heating days than cooling, to prevent heat from leaving the interior space through the window areas, look for films with a low emissivity. Some heat can be prevented from leaving the space by reflecting it back into the room. These films will also work to control glare, prevent fading from ultraviolet light, and control summer heat gain.

Problem: Glare

  • Glare is a serious issue, especially in an office or classroom environment. In many of today’s offices and classrooms, the strong light from the windows creates considerable glare. Glare makes it difficult to see computer screens as well as contributes headaches, squinting and eye discomfort. Solar control window film reduces glare by decreasing visible light. Decreasing the level of contrast between room lighting and strong external light minimizes many of these problems.
  • A high amount of visible light coming into a space is the source of glare. The visible light portion of solar energy is easily controlled with window film.
  • To reduce visible light, choose a film that both absorbs visible light and reflects it. In the performance results, look for a film with a low level of Visible Light Transmission (%T). Typically, films that provide low levels of visible light transmission absorb high amounts of solar energy (high Solar Energy Absorbtance %A). On some types of glass, the high solar energy absorption may cause glass breakage.

Problem: Privacy

  •  When glass does not provide the level of visual privacy required, window film offers a number of options. Specialty films like clear frost or black or white opaque films offer several choices for privacy. Clear frost allows the transmission of light but alters the ability to see through the glass. Opaque films let virtually no light or vision come through the glass. For semi-privacy, the Decogard series offers opaque white patterns on clear film.
  • Daytime interior privacy can be achieved by the selection of a solar control film with High Visible Light Reflectance (% R). Solar control films work to provide privacy based on the imbalance of light between interior spaces and strong outdoor light levels. Solar control film does not provide interior privacy at night because the lighting imbalance reverses and it becomes easy to see into the lighted interior space from the dark outdoors.
  • Films with high visible light reflection generally have high solar energy reflection. This may become an issue when used on insulated glass units (dual pane) or tinted glass. Use the performance results to determine the film that is most appropriate for your application and window type.
  • Window film can be used to turn ordinary glass into one-way glass. Important for one way glass performance is that the area to be observed is always more brightly lighted than the area from which observations are being made.
  • To use film for one-way glass, select a film that has a high Visible Light Reflection (%R).

Problem: UV Light

  •  Ultraviolet radiation and its damaging effects to the human skin and furnishings are evident whether outside, in the car, or sitting near a building’s windows. Protection from the harmful effects of ultraviolet is available with the full line of Tint Depot window film products. Our solar control as well as safety and security films stop at least 98% of ultraviolet light energy (between 300-380 nanometers) at the film. The construction of certain films stops over 99% of ultraviolet light.
  • This means that window film acts as a permanent sunscreen for your windows. If typical window films carried an SPF label, it would read SPF 350+…that’s a lot of ^ protection.
  • Special ultraviolet absorbers are added to the laminating and mounting adhesives of window film. The benefits are longer window film life and excellent protection from UV light for people and interior furnishings

Problem: Fading

  • Fading is a complex process. Solar energy alone does not cause fading. Fabric dyes decompose from heat and humidity over time. Cleaning fluids, low quality fabric dyes, certain colors or the very combination of the dye and fabric will affect fading.
  • All three types of solar energy, infrared visible light and ultraviolet light contribute to fading and drying of wood and fabrics that shortens the life span of furnishings.
  • Different solar control window films stop different amounts of visible light, solar heat, and virtually all of the ultraviolet energy (between 300-380 nanometers) passing through a window. In the performance results, you will find films with maximum protection against fading. Choose a window film that transmits low visible light.

Problem: Appearance

  • Windows often dominate the exterior appearance of many of today’s buildings. The appearance of a building can be impacted and improved with the addition of solar control window film. By using window film to change the color and reflectivity of the glass, an older building can be updated. Highly reflective films appear to mask, from the external viewer, the clutter that office inhabitants collect on windowsills or the effect of inconsistent window treatments at the window.
  • Window film is available in a variety of color and performance options that match today’s trends in glass color and energy efficiency properties. Window films offer choices of visible light transmissions and reflective properties to provide everything from a hint of color to a wall of color to satisfy every building’s appearance requirement.
  • Often the appearance of an historic building cannot be altered, but there is a need to make the existing glass safer or to provide some level of solar control. Look to window film to fill that need. Using film with a high Visible Light Transmission (%T) provides protection against ultraviolet light and some solar protection while doing little to alter the appearance, such as might be needed in a museum. Historic preservation committees generally accept window film because it is aesthetically acceptable and removable. Where ultraviolet protection and making safer glass is required, the use of clear safety films do the job with no alternation in window appearance.

Problem: Electromagnetic Interference

  • Adverse effects caused by electromagnetic radiation are termed electromagnetic interference or EMI. Electronic equipment sensitive to this type of radio frequency (RF) or radiation energy must be shielded from external EMI sources in order to ensure proper performance of the equipment or to prevent the interception of data from that equipment.
  • Certain solar control window films provide attenuation of the effects of electromagnetic interference for the exterior glass portions of a building or whenever the film is installed on glass.
  • As part of the effort to prevent security breaches in government organizations and commercial enterprises, EMI shielding is used to prevent the theft of electronic information.
  • Electromagnetic shielding is desirable for several reasons:
    • To exclude or decrease unwanted electromagnetic radiation or signals To contain electromagnetic signals which can disrupt neighboring equipment such as a computer
    • To minimize the opportunity for interception of confidential data
  • Solar control window film provides EMI shielding for glass areas by reflection of the signal/radiation. The amount of protection depends on the quantity and the conductivity of the metal applied to the film. Reflectance is dependent on the signal/radiation frequency. Generally as frequency increases the reflectance of the shielding material also increases.
  • The degree of attenuation or rejection of RF energy is measured in decibels (dB). An attenuation level of 25 dB is considered an effective rejection level for radio frequency. Depending on the one chosen, solar control window film can provide rejection levels of over 99% based on the tested frequencies. See our test summary for attenuation levels.

Worksheet

  • These are the column headings from the performance results sheets. Write a definition of your own words that makes sense to you and you will remember. You may reference this handout, the glossary or the IWFA Manual.
Heading Definition
Solar energy transmittance
Solar energy absorptance
Solar energy reflectance
Visible light transmittance
Visible light absorptance
Visible light reflectance
Emissivity
Summer U-value
Winter U-value
Shading coefficient
Ultraviolet Light transmission
Total Solar Energy Rejected

Exercise – Making Film Selections

  •  Below are a series of problems that a customer might present to you. All of the windows are single pane clear glass. Select your film recommendation, report which of the criteria from the film performance results you are using to base your judgement on and say why you think this is the best film to solve the problem.
  • You will have the opportunity to sell this film to your classmates.
  • This is worth 20 Dollars!
Problem Film Choice Criteria Used Why this film
Restaurant, people will not sit by the windows because it is too hot
Old Holiday Inn – you can see towels and sneakers through the windows as you drive by
Make me cooler in my unair-conditioned home.
An interrogation room where the police would like to watch through the window to the hall.
Gym wants privacy
Saving Energy in Ohio
Glare with considerable heat gain
Motel room carpet fading
Update appearance of a natural sand color building
Reflection on computer monitors
Home with water view, no window treatments and it is very bright
Employees with window offices who are hot in the afternoons
Saving Energy in Los Angles

PROBLEM SOLVING WITH THE TINT DEPOT OF FILMS

 Objectives:

  • To understand how to select Tint Depot Films based on performance ratings
  • To be able to select film to solve specific problems related to the problems of glass.

 What we will cover:

  • Review of benefits
  • Choosing a film
  • Sorting through the choices
  • Using Film Performance Results sheets
  • Indicators of Energy Transfer
  • Indicators of Insulation
  • Solving problems based on solar performance

Solar Control Window Film For Solutions

  •  Blocks a significant amount of soiar heat energy

– Reduces air-conditioning loads and costs
– Reduces hot spots near windows
– Improves occupant comfort

  • The film industry for architectural windows started because of the need for solar control and energy savings. The business was built on Silver 20. It is a workhorse of a film
  • Overtime, consumer requirements have changed. • To meet the requirements of today’s consumer you need an understanding offiim choices so you can select the film that best meets the customer’s requirement.
  • The primary function of solar control film is to manage energy from the sun as it passes through a window.
  • Film changes what happens to the energy when it strikes the glass, providing multiple benefits for both the interior and exterior of the building.
  • Solar control window films have the following benefits: -Blocks out significant amounts of solar heat energy. -Reducing “hot spots” around windows and glass doors, improving occupant comfort and -Reducing air conditioning loads along with utility bills.

-Blocks out significant amounts of solar heat energy.
-Reducing “hot spots” around windows and glass doors, improving occupant comfort and
-Reducing air conditioning loads along with utility bills.

Solar Control Film also

  • Reduces glare
  • Increases privacy
  • Absorbs ultraviolet light
  • Improves the appearance of older buildings
  • Is available in solar safety versions
  • Rejects nearly all of the damaging ultraviolet,
  • Reducing fading of furnishings, window treatments and carpeting. Increases daytime privacy
  • Reduces glare so occupants view computer or television screens more easily
  • Improves external appearance of older buildings
  • Reduces electromagnetic interference in limited frequencies.

Solar Control Film Works

  • It works 24 hours, 7 days a week
  • Passive protection
  • Needs no maintenance
  • Lasts over a decade
  • When compared to special order tinted glass, solar control window films are readily available with a wide product selection providing a variety of looks and performance levels. Window film is and can economically retrofit any window into a high performance glazing system. Tint Depot provides manufacturer owned distribution throughout the world to meet your window film needs.
  • Different films are used to address each of these problems
  • We will learn how to select the right film to address each problem

How does film work?

  • Tough polyester film is metallized, treated with a scratch resistant coating and an adhesive that secures the film to glass
  • It is the type and the amount of the metal that begins differentiates film performance.
  • Scratch resistant coatings result in easy maintenance and long-term optical clarity

Each Layer Contributes

  • Glass Surface
  • Adhesive Layer
  • Metallized Polyester Film
  • Durogard Hardcoat
  • Contributions of each layer:

– Adhesive keeps it on the window
– Provides performance
– Keeps surface from scratching, contributes to long-term optical clarity

Choosing a Film

  • Tint Depot manufactures over 100 films with over 50 films for flat glass •
  • Various components contribute to various benefits –
  • Performance results guide your choice
  • Tint Depot offers nearly 100 different window films to meet changing customer needs and desires.
  • Helping a customer choose the most appropriate film for an architectural application can seem difficult.
  • Often a dealer sells the film he or she knows, or from the roll on the shelf. Neither of these methods ensures your customer’s long term satisfaction.

 The Tint Depot Line-Up

  • With over 100 different films, what are the differences in films and why might one be better than another for a specific application?

Once you know the answer — you are a window film professional.

What goes into selecting film?

  • Knowledge of :

– Solar energy and heat transfer
– What happens when sunlight strikes glass
– How film is made
– Glass and glazing
– Glass breakage and IG seals

  • Window film solves the problems that come with sunlight striking the glass
  • Now that you more fully understand the problem you can work on the solution
  • Understanding the difference between films makes selling film easier. Selling from fact and knowledge brings credibility to you and your business.
  • Up selling is simplified when you are able to build benefit upon benefit.
  • Architectural glass customers will pay more when they understand they get more.

Sorting Through the Choices

  • Tint Depot are divided into 4 major groups

– Non-reflective or reflective
– PS or CDA adhesive

  • Think of film as being divided into four major groups.
  • All films are reflective or non-reflective with either pressure sensitive or clear dry adhesive.

Non-reflective Films

  • Many are auto films
  • Architectural non-reflective

-Clear
– Specialty
– Patterns or colors

  • Tint Depot non-reflective films are clear or dyed.
  • Many non-reflective automotive films are designed to enhance the appearance of car windows.
  • Clear safety and security films are designed to only provide protection against glass breakage or flying shards of glass.
  • The patterned specialty films have a design printed directly on the surface, while the colored specialty films provide the opportunity for color to meet special needs.

Non-reflective

  • Usually address appearance
  • UV protection is incorporated
  • No solar rejection through reflection
  • Generally not performers

– Exception white opaque

  • Non-reflective films offer great diversity in appearance.
  • Ultraviolet absorbers are incorporated into the construction of the non-reflective films, making ultraviolet protection part of the benefits of these films.
  • Non-reflective films offer no measure of solar protection through reflection, but often will show performance as measured by Total Solar Energy Rejected because some of these films absorb energy based on their dark color.
  • The one exception is white opaque specialty film. Both the solar and the visible light reflectance, reported on the performance results sheet, for non-reflective films are very low, except white opaque.

Reflective

  • Reflect solar energy and visible light
  • Tint Depot known for sputtered reflective films
  • Change in metal = change in appearance

– Dyed layer modifies yet again

  • Reflective films reflect solar energy and visible light.
  • Tint Depot is known for their reflective films which are manufactured by sputtering metal onto the surface of the polyester film.
  • Within the category of reflective film there are different levels of reflection. More metal on the film means higher performance as a result of greater reflection. The variance in reflectance is seen in the solar and visible light reflectance numbers on the Performance Rating Sheet.
  • A variety of metals sputtered onto the surface of the film provide a variety of film appearances. A change in metal equals a change in appearance.
  • A dyed layer of film may be laminated onto the film to modify the appearance yet again.

Pressure Sensitive adhesives

  • All automotive films

– For tack and holding onto curved glass

  • All safety and security films

– For holding broken glass on film surface

  • Many solar control films
  • The majority of Tint Depot are available with pressure sensitive adhesives
  • All automotive films are pressure sensitive to provide immediate tack and to hold the film to curved glass surfaces.
  • All safety and security films have pressure sensitive adhesive.

-These films are manufactured with a thicker, tackier adhesive.
-This adhesive not only holds the heavier film but more importantly, the glass adheres to the film in case of a forced break.

Clear Dry Adhesive

  • Superb optical properties
  • Makes film handling easier for large windows
  • Becoming the preferred adhesive system for solar control
  • Clear dry adhesives (CDA) have superb optical properties.
  • This adhesive system makes film handling easier to for architectural applications that may require wide film cut into large pieces.
  • This is fast becoming the preferred adhesive system for architectural solar control films in the industry for ease of handling and the time that is saved in installation.
  • Clear Dry Adhesive is used exclusively on our solar control Designer Window Films with the exception of the safety film products.

Thickness

  • Measured in mil

– 1 -mil = .001 of an inch

  • Solar control film 1 to 2 mil thick

– Single ply or laminated stack

  • All films 4-mil and thicker are safety and security films
  • Solar control film is generally 1 to 2 mil thick

– made up of single ply of polyester or
– laminated stack of polyester depending on the performance criteria.

  • All films 4 Mil and thicker are considered safety and security films.

– Most are available with additional solar control properties Having solar control options available in solar safety films provides the opportunity “up-selling”.
– A customer who calls wanting glass breakage protection can add solar control for a small increase to the total job cost.
– The same is true for a customer who calls for solar control, while the job is being done they can add the protection of safety and security film.

The Series

  • Film performance results on the performance sheets are grouped by series
  • The series name based on type of metal sputtered onto the surface
  • The number by the name based on VLT
  • The Film Performance Results sheets group the film by series.
  • The number portion of the film name is based on the VLT of that film.

Film Performance Results

  • The Performance result sheets are your fact sheets –
  • Tint Depot offers performance results for each film manufactured.
  • Note:
  • These results are derived from an actual sample measured by a UVA/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer. The wavelength data read by the spectrophotometer then Is fed into various software programs to be evaluated on several factors. The final step of this process feeds the results to the Window 4.1 software program that generates all the Film Performance Results Numbers. The Window 4.1 program was developed by Lawrence Berkley Labs under federal funding to standardize glass and glazing test methodologies. Because the production of these numbers is standardized, it is possible for a consumer to compare various glazing options.
  • Whether you are reading shading coefficients, visible light transmission or any of the reported data, for any glazing product, the same methods have been used to calculate those numbers. This should be true for glass, laminated glass, windows, solar screens, solar shades or any product you see solar performance numbers. The product is measured with a specialized spectrophotometer and interpreted with standardized software. This allows a retrofit product like film to be compared to the highest performing, newest glass being manufactured. The way these numbers are generated brings credibility to both the performance results and to our industry as a

Solar Bronze

  • Warm copper appearance
  • Good performance
  • The Solar Bronze films have a warm copper appearance designed to harmonize with neutral, natural color schemes
  • This series of films is available in a variety of light transmission values providing a range of solar benefits.
  • Good performance for EMI shielding.

AG Low-E

  • Low-Em missivity film
  • Designed for climates with more heating days than cooling days
  • Excellent TSER

 

  • AG – Low-E is a window film in a class by itself.
  • It was designed as film for climates with more heating days than cooling days.
  • This low emmissivity film reflects heat (true blackbody heat) back into the room during times of cold exterior temperatures. In addition, SummerA/Vinter25 has a high total solar energy reflectance (%R) so it works as an excellent film for summer heat rejection.
  • AG – Low-E is an excellent choice to consider if glare control in a heating climate is a major criterion for your application because of the VLT numbers.

Spectrally Select Series

  • Designed for greater solar energy rejection with higher visible light transmission
  • Tint Depot films with the highest luminous efficacy
  • Commercial applications

– storefront windows
– maximizing daylighting

  • Spectrally select films provide greater solar energy rejection performance combined with higher visible light transmissions when compared to conventional films.
  • These films were designed especially for residential applications where performance and visible light are the requirement.
  • Commercially these films are key to storefront windows as well as maximizing day lighting techniques.

Dual Reflective Series

  • Combine solar energy rejection with low interior reflectivity
  • Designed for uncovered windows at night
  • Tint Depot Dual Reflective films combine solar energy rejection performance with lower interior reflectivity when compared to conventional films.
  • Interior reflectivity is especially important for windows without draperies or other window treatments in a room that is used with light after dark.
  • Large, view-oriented residential windows or windows in commercial spaces with high night activity levels are two excellent applications for dual reflective films. Autumn Bronze dual-reflective commercial and residential window film with a high-range total solar energy rejection rating of 68%.

– Autumn Bronze is utilized for buildings where a bronze appearance is desired.
– It’s the best bronze film to choose when high-range heat and fade rejection performance, combined with lower interior reflectivity at night is required.

Performance Results

  • Report what happens when sunlight strikes glass with film
  • Performance is defined by the numbers
  • The numbers guide choice of film
  • Film performance results are your major tool for film selection
  • Problem solving is guided by the numbers

Film Performance Results

  • Film performance results are available through you service center in printed form.
  • One side of these reports the performance on 1/8″ glass and the other on 1/4″ glass.
  • Available on the Web
  • Performance results are available on the web.

Film Performance Results

  • Available to go with samples
  • Performance results are also available in sample books.

Using Performance Results

  • Each performance result is used as an indication of some benefit of film
  • Same test methodology used to report data for all glazing products
  • Film choice should be based on the requirements for a specific customer.
  • At the very least, learn to use visible light transmission, visible light reflectance, as well as shading coefficient, total solar energy rejection or solar heat gain coefficients to make informed choices to meet your customers needs.
  • After looking at an Architectural Performance Results sheet, you begin to realize that films that appear similar perform very differently on the window,

– Some components of film may selectively block certain wavelengths. Other components block others wavelengths.
– It Is the combination of these components that can produce wide differences in the performance of film

Indicators of Energy Transfer

  • % T (Transmittance) = energy or light that passes through
  • % A (Absorptance) = energy or light that remains in the glass
  • %R (Reflectance) = energy or light that is reflected away

 

  • Solar Energy

– % T (Transmittance) – an indicator of how much energy is coming into the room.
– % A (Absorptance) – an indicator of how much energy is going into the glass. Absorbed energy raises glass temperature.
– % R (Reflectance) – an indicator of the amount of energy that is reflected away from the window.

  • Visible Light

– % T (Transmittance) – an indicator of how much light passes through the glass and into the room.
– % A (Absorptance) – an indicator of how much light is lost into the glass.
– Exterior % R (Reflectance) – an indicator of the amount of light that is reflected away from the window toward the outside. This as well as color is an indicator of how shiny the window will look from the outside. If the film is applied on tinted glass, that often reduces the shiny appearance of a film with a exterior reflectance.

Indicators of Insulation

  • E (Emmissivity) = Ability to absorb and radiate heat back, ↓ better to reflect winter heat into room.
  • U-value = heat transfer, ↓ the better, less heat transfers.
  • Emmissivity – indicates the reflection of room radiant heat back into the room. An important indicator for cooler climates.
  • Thermal Energy

-U-Value (Summer) a measure of heat loss. Will be an indication of shielding from outdoor summer conditions. Because U-value measurement is based on the temperature difference between outdoor and indoor temperatures, summer U-Value is based on a smaller temperature difference than winter U-value.

-U-Value (Winter) a measure of heat loss. Will be an indication of blocking the .loss of heat through the window to the outside. Because U-value measurement is based on the temperature difference between outdoor and indoor temperatures, winter U-Value is based on a greater temperature difference than summer U-Value.

Indicators of Heat Rejection

  • SC = ratio of heat gain passing through window with film to window without film, ↓ the better.
  • SHGC = ability to reject solar heat, ↓ the better
  • TSER (Total Solar Energy Rejected) = % solar energy kept out of room,↑ better
  • Shading Coefficient – an indicator of the effectiveness of window film in rejecting heat as compared to clear glass.
  • Solar Heat Gain Coefficient – an indicator of the effectiveness of window film that is used by engineers or architects and is often requested by them for the energy saving calculations. It measures the percentage of near infrared energy directly transmitted or absorbed and then reradiated to the building.
  • UV Light % T – is an indicator of the amount of ultraviolet energy that passes through the window. Is a effective indicator of the ability of film to block the 40% of fading that is attributed to ultraviolet energy.
  • Total Solar Energy Rejected measures a film’s ability to reject solar energy. Visible light and infrared radiation energy are combined in this measurement. TSER equals the solar reflectance plus the part of solar absorption that was absorbed by the glass and radiates back into the room.

Why is Reflectance Better?

  • The sum of absorbance and reflectance produce an indicator of energy that does not go through a window

– After energy is absorbed Into the window, it eventually leaves the window to the cooler side of the glass.

  • Heat energy that is absorbed into a window is merely being stored to be released into a cooler space.
  • -Remember energy movement is from hot to cold
  • If a room is air conditioned the release of that heat merely is heating up the space causing the air-conditioning to work harder
  • Reflected energy doesn’t stay in the glass. It isn’t converted to heat. The air-conditioner never sees this energy.

Using Performance Data

Measure Heat Transmrttance Absorptance Reflectance Visible Light Transmrttance* Absorptance* Reflectance* Emissivrtty Summer U-Value Wnter U-Value Shading Coefficient Solar Heat Gain Coefficient Ultraviolet Light transmission Total Solar Energy Rejection (TSER)  Heat though the window

Heat absorbed by the window

Heat reflected away from window

More light through the window

Block view thmughfrie window

Reduce glare

Ability to keep heat in (winter)

Heat loss through a material

hleat loss through a material

Heat ccMTing in window

Heat coming in window

UV into the room

Heat kept out at the window

Better

Lower

Lower

Higher

Higher

Higher

Lower

Higher

Higher

Lower

Higher

Lower

Lover

Lower

Lower

Lower

Lover

Higher

 


Problem: Solar Heat Gain

  • Solution
    • Choose a film

– with Low SHGC

  • In a building with a glass fagade, solar heat gain through the east, west and south facing windows can account for up to 80% of the air-conditioning load.
  • Reducing solar energy at the window, reduces the amount of heat coming through the window into interior space. Solar heat gain at the windows is one of the causes of hot spots at the perimeter of large office spaces. Generally, it is difficult to air-condition these areas without causing those people who are sitting away from the windows to be too cold.
  • To reduce solar heat gain, choose a film that reflects as much solar energy as possible.
  • In the performance results, look for a film with a low shading coefficient or a low solar heat gain coefficient.
  • In heating climates –
    • In climates with more heating days than cooling, to prevent heat from leaving the interior space through the window areas, look for films with a low emissivity.
    • Some heat can be prevented from leaving the space by p.37 ‘t back into the room. These films will also 2/18/2003 work to control glare, prevent fading from ultraviolet

Problem: Energy Costs

  • Solution
    • Choose a film for

– Heating climate: Low E
– Cooling climate:
– Low SHGC

  • Know if your climate is predominately heating or cooling
  • For cooling

– When air-conditioning equipment seems insufficient to carry the cooling load the addition of solar film can reduce the load sufficiently to prevent expensive re-engineering.
– In the performance results, look for a film with a low shading coefficient or a low solar heat gain coefficient.
– These numbers are used to determine the energy cost savings with film.

  • For heating

– The best year round energy savings numbers for cold climates will come from a Low-emissivity film.
– Low-e films reflect heat back into the room, keeping it from being conducted through the window.
– For climates with heavy air-conditioning requirements you need Low Solar Heat Gain Numbers
– Absorbed heat is accounted for in Solar Heat Gain, making it better indicator of energy savings.

Problem: Glare

  • Solution

– Choose a film with Low VLT

  • Visible light causes glare
  • Glare is a serious issue, especially in an office or classroom environment.

– Strong light from the windows creates considerable glare.
-Glare makes it difficult to see computer screens as well as contributes headaches, squinting and eye discomfort.

  • Solar control window film reduces glare by decreasing visible light.

– Decreasing the level of contrast between room lighting and strong external light minimizes many of these problems.

  • To reduce visible light, choose a film that both absorbs visible light and reflects it. • Look for a film with a low level of Visible Light Transmission (%T). Typically, films that provide low levels of visible light transmission absorb high amounts of solar energy (high Solar Energy Absorbtance %A). On some types of glass, the high solar energy absorption may cause glass  breakage.
  • Dual reflective is an excellent film for maximum glare control

Problem: Privacy

  • Solution

– Choose a film with Low VLT and/or High VLR

  • When glass does not provide the level of visual privacy required, window film offers a number of options.
  • Specialty films like clear frost or black or white opaque films offer several choices for privacy. Clear frost will allow the transmission of light but alters the ability to see through the glass.
  • Opaque films let virtually no light or vision come through the glass. For semi-privacy
  • Decogard series offers opaque white patterns on clear film. • Daytime interior privacy can be achieved by the selection of a solar control film with High Visible Light Reflectance (% R)
  • Solar control films work to provide privacy based on the imbalance of light between interior spaces and strong outdoor light levels. Solar control film does not provide interior privacy at night because the imbalance of light reverses and it becomes easy to see into the lighted interior space from the dark outdoors.
  • Films with high visible light reflection

Problem: One-way Glass

  • In-expensive solution

– Select a film with high visible light reflection
– Works when area to be observed has higher light levels than the area where the person observing is

  • One way glass
  • Window film can be used to turn ordinary glass into one-way glass.
  • Important for one way glass performance is that the area to be observed is always more brightly lighted than the area from which observations are being made.
  • To use a film for one-way glass, select a film that has a high Visible Light Reflection (%R).

Problem: Ultraviolet Light

  • Solution

– All Tint Depot block almost all UV energy
– Choose any of them to block the harmful effects of UV light on skin

  • Whether outside, in the car, or sitting near a building’s windows, ultraviolet radiation and its damaging effects to the human skin and furnishings are there.
  • Protection from the harmful effects of ultraviolet is available with the full line of Tint Depot Film products.
  • Our solar control as well as safety and security films stop at least 98% of ultraviolet light energy ( between 300-380 nanometers) at the film. The construction of certain films stops over 99% of ultraviolet light.
  • This means that window film acts as a permanent sunscreen for your windows. If typical window films carried an SPF label, it would read SPF 350+…that’s a lot of protection.
  • Special ultraviolet absorbers are added to the laminating and mounting adhesives of window film. The benefits are longer window film life and excellent protection from UV light for people and interior furnishings. 

Problem: Fading

  • Solution

– Choose a film with
– High TSER

  • Fading is a complex process.

– Solar energy alone does not cause fading.
– Fabric dyes decompose from heat and humidity over time.
– Cleaning fluids, low quality fabric dyes, certain colors or the very combination of the dye and fabric will affect fading.

  • All three types of solar energy, infrared visible light and ultraviolet light, contribute to the fading and drying out of wood and fabrics that shortens the life span of furnishings.
  • Different solar control window films stop different amounts of visible light, solar heat, and virtually all of the ultraviolet energy (between 300-380 nanometers) passing through a window.
  • Choose a window film that transmits low visible light and high solar energy, (low %T).

Problem: Building Appearance

  • Solution

– Choose a film that brings out p| the best in your

  • Windows dominates the exterior appearance of many of today’s buildings.
  • The appearance can be improved with solar control window film. By using window film to change the color and reflectivity of the glass, an older building can be updated..
  • Window film is available in a variety of color and performance options that imitate today’s trends in glass color and energy efficiency properties.
  • Window films offer choices of visible light transmissions and reflective properties to provide everything from a hint of color to a wall of color to satisfy every building’s appearance requirement.
  • In historic buildings appearance cannot be altered, but there is a need to make the existing glass safer or to provide some level of solar control.

– Film with a high Visible Light Transmission (%T) provides protection against ultraviolet light and some solar protection while doing little to alter the appearance.

Electromagnetic interference

  • Certain solar control window films provide EMI attenuation
  • EMI attenuation:

– Decreases unwanted electromagnetic signals
– Contains electromagnetic signals
– Minimizes interception of confidential data

  • Adverse effects caused by electromagnetic radiation are termed electromagnetic Interference or EMI. Electronic equipment sensitive to this type of radio frequency (RF) or radiation energy must be shielded from external EMI sources in order to ensure proper performance of the equipment or to prevent the interception of data from that equipment.
  • Certain solar control window films provide attenuation of the effects of electromagnetic interference for the exterior glass portions of a building or whenever the film is installed on glass.
  • To prevent security breaches in government organizations and commercial enterprises, EMI shielding is used to prevent the theft of electronic information.
  • Electromagnetic shielding is desirable for several reasons:

– To exclude or decrease unwanted electromagnetic radiation or signals
– To contain electromagnetic signals which can disrupt neighboring equipment such as a computer
– To minimize the opportunity for interception of confidential data

  • Solar control window film provides EMI shielding for glass areas by reflection of the signal/radiation. The amount of protection depends on the quantity and the conductivity of the metal applied to the film. Reflectance is dependent on the signal/radiation frequency. Generally as frequency increases the reflectance of the shielding material also increases.
  • The degree of attenuation or rejection of RF energy is measured in decibels (dB). An attenuation level of 26 dB is considered an effective rejection level for radio frequency. Depending on the one chosen, solar control window film can provide rejection levels of over 99% based on the tested frequencies. See our test summary for attenuation levels.