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Problem Solving

SELECTING TINT DEPOT TO SOLVE PROBLEMS

BENEFITS OF SOLAR CONTROL WINDOW FILMS

CHOOSING SOLAR CONTROL WINDOW FILMS

THE TINT DEPOT LINE-UP

THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TINT DEPOT TYPES

Non-Reflective Reflective
Pressure

Sensitive

Adhesive

Non-Reflective Automotive Films High Performance Automotive Films
Clear Safety & Security Films Architectural Films:
 

2Mil Clear

4Mil Clear

7 Mil Clear

8Mil Clear

10Mil Clear

11Mil Clear

12 Mill Clear

 

Specialty Films

Clear Frost

Black Opaque

White Opaque

Rose Red

Royal Blue

Emerald Green

7 Mil Graffitigard

Gossamer

Mini-Blind

Regimental Bars

Regimental Bars

Bold Block

Venetian Blind

Stainless Steel

Stainless Steel 50

Stainless Steel 30

Stainless Steel 20

Stainless Steel 10

 

Solar Bronze

Solar Bronze 50

Solar Bronze 35

Solar Bronze 20

 

Aluminum

Silver 50

Silver 35

Silver 20

Bronze/Silver 15

Gold/Silver 20

Grey/Silver/Grey 10

Bronze/Silver/Bronze 10

Low-Emissivity

Silver Ag 25 Low-E

Solar Safety & Security Films

4 Mil Stainless Steel 50

4 Mil Stainless Steel 35

4 Mil Stainless Steel 30

4 Mil Stainless Steel 20

8 Mil Stainless Steel 50

8 Mil Stainless Steel 35

8 Mil Stainless Steel 20

10 Mil Stainless Steel 50

10 Mil Stainless Steel 35

4 Mil Solar Bronze 35

4 Mil Solar Bronze 20

4 Mil Silver 20

8 Mil Silver 20

10 Mil Silver 20

Panorama Solar Safety Films*

4 Mil Sterling 40

4 Mil Sterling 50

4-Mil Sterling 60

Clear Dry

Adhesive

Stainless Steel

Stainless Steel 50

Stainless Steel 35

Stainless Steel 20

Quantum

antum Quantum/Silver/Quantum 20

Quantum/Silver/Quantum 10

Solar Bronze

lar Bronze Solar Bronze 50

Solar Bronze 35

Solar Bronze 20

 

Non-reflective Films

Reflective films

ADHESIVE SYSTEM

Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

Clear dry adhesives

THICKNESS

THE SERIES

Stainless Steel Series

Stainless Steel Performance

 Quantum

 Solar Bronze

Aluminum Series

Summer/Winter Low-Emissivify

Panorama Designer Window Films

Sterling Spectrally Selective Series

Slate Grey Dual Reflective Series

THE PERFORMANCE RESULTS NUMBERS

USING THE PERFORMANCE RESULTS TO SOLVE PROBLEMS

– % T (Transmittance) – an indicator of how much energy is coming into the room.
– % A (Absorptance) – an indicator of how much energy is going into the glass. Absorbed energy raises glass temperature.
– % R (Reflectance) – an indicator of the amount of energy that is reflected away from the window.

– % T (Transmittance) – an indicator of how much light passes through the glass and into the room.
– % A (Absorptance) – an indicator of how much light is lost into the glass.
– Exterior % R (Reflectance) – an indicator of the amount of light that is reflected away from the window toward the outside. This as well as color is an indicator of how shiny the window will look from the outside. If the film is applied on tinted glass, that often reduces the shiny appearance of a film with a high exterior reflectance.
– Interior % R (Reflectance) – an indicator of the amount of light that is reflected from the window toward the interior of the room.

– U-Value (Summer) a measure of heat loss. Will be an indication of shielding from outdoor summer conditions. Because U-value measurement is based on the temperature difference between outdoor and indoor temperatures, summer U-Value is based on a smaller temperature difference than winter U-value
– U-Value (Winter) a measure of heat loss. Will be an indication of blocking the loss of heat through the window to the outside. Because U-value measurement is based on the temperature difference between outdoor and indoor temperatures, winter U-Value is based on a greater temperature difference than summer U-Value.

 

Measure When Used Better
Heat Transmittance

Absorptance

Reflectance

Visible Light Transmittance

Absorptance

Reflectance

Emissivity

Summer U-Value

Winter U-Value

Shading Coefficient

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient

Ultraviolet Light transmission

Total Solar Energy Rejection (TSER

Heat though the window

Heat absorbed by the window

Heat reflected away from window

More light through the window

Block view through the window

Reduce glare

Reduce glare

Ability to keep heat in (winter)

Heat loss through a material

Heat loss through a material

Heat coming in window

Heat coming in window

UV into the room

Heat kept out at the window

Lower

Lower

Higher

Higher

Lower

Higher

Higher

Lower

Lower

Lower

Lower

Lower

Lower

Highe

 

ROLL WIDTH

MAXIMIZING PERFORMANCE BY SELECTING THE RIGHT FILM

The Problem: Reduce Solar Heat Gain

Problem: Energy Costs

In cooling climates –

In heating climates

Problem: Glare

Problem: Privacy

Problem: UV Light

Problem: Fading

Problem: Appearance

Problem: Electromagnetic Interference

Worksheet

 

Heading Definition
Solar energy transmittance
Solar energy absorptance
Solar energy reflectance
Visible light transmittance
Visible light absorptance
Visible light reflectance
Emissivity
Summer U-value
Winter U-value
Shading coefficient
Ultraviolet Light transmission  

 

Total Solar Energy Rejected

 

Exercise – Making Film Selections

 

Problem Film Choice Criteria Used Why this film
Restaurant, people will not sit by the windows because it is too hot
Old Holiday Inn – you can see towels and sneakers through the windows as you drive by
Make me cooler in my unair-conditioned home.
An interrogation room where the police would like to watch through the window to the hall.
Gym wants privacy  

 

Saving Energy in Ohio
Glare with considerable heat gain
Motel room carpet fading
Update appearance of a natural sand color building
Reflection on computer monitors  

 

 

Home with water view, no window treatments and it is very bright
Employees with window offices who are hot in the afternoons
Saving Energy in Los Angles

 

PROBLEM SOLVING WITH THE TINT DEPOT OF FILMS

 Objectives:

 What we will cover:

Solar Control Window Film For Solutions

– Reduces air-conditioning loads and costs
– Reduces hot spots near windows
– Improves occupant comfort

-Blocks out significant amounts of solar heat energy.
-Reducing “hot spots” around windows and glass doors, improving occupant comfort and
-Reducing air conditioning loads along with utility bills.

Solar Control Film also

Solar Control Film Works

How does film work?

Each Layer Contributes

 

– Adhesive keeps it on the window
– Provides performance
– Keeps surface from scratching, contributes to long-term optical clarity

Choosing a Film

 

 The Tint Depot Line-Up

Once you know the answer — you are a window film professional.

What goes into selecting film?

– Solar energy and heat transfer
– What happens when sunlight strikes glass
– How film is made
– Glass and glazing
– Glass breakage and IG seals

Sorting Through the Choices

– Non-reflective or reflective
– PS or CDA adhesive

Non-reflective Films

-Clear
– Specialty
– Patterns or colors

Non-reflective

– Exception white opaque

Reflective

– Dyed layer modifies yet again

Pressure Sensitive adhesives

– For tack and holding onto curved glass

– For holding broken glass on film surface

 

-These films are manufactured with a thicker, tackier adhesive.
-This adhesive not only holds the heavier film but more importantly, the glass adheres to the film in case of a forced break.

Clear Dry Adhesive

Thickness

– 1 -mil = .001 of an inch

– Single ply or laminated stack

– made up of single ply of polyester or
– laminated stack of polyester depending on the performance criteria.

– Most are available with additional solar control properties Having solar control options available in solar safety films provides the opportunity “up-selling”.
– A customer who calls wanting glass breakage protection can add solar control for a small increase to the total job cost.
– The same is true for a customer who calls for solar control, while the job is being done they can add the protection of safety and security film.

The Series

 

Film Performance Results

Stainless Steel

 

Quantum

– Use only on heat-strengthened or tempered glass

 

Solar Bronze

 

Aluminum Series

 

 

AG Low-E

 

Panorama Designer Films

– Installation skill
– Business skill

Spectrally Select Series

– storefront windows
– maximizing daylighting

Dual Reflective Series

 

– Autumn Bronze is utilized for buildings where a bronze appearance is desired.
– It’s the best bronze film to choose when high-range heat and fade rejection performance, combined with lower interior reflectivity at night is required.

Performance Results

Film Performance Results

 

Film Performance Results

Using Performance Results

 

– Some components of film may selectively block certain wavelengths. Other components block others wavelengths.
– It Is the combination of these components that can produce wide differences in the performance of film

Indicators of Energy Transfer

 

– % T (Transmittance) – an indicator of how much energy is coming into the room.
– % A (Absorptance) – an indicator of how much energy is going into the glass. Absorbed energy raises glass temperature.
– % R (Reflectance) – an indicator of the amount of energy that is reflected away from the window.

– % T (Transmittance) – an indicator of how much light passes through the glass and into the room.
– % A (Absorptance) – an indicator of how much light is lost into the glass.
– Exterior % R (Reflectance) – an indicator of the amount of light that is reflected away from the window toward the outside. This as well as color is an indicator of how shiny the window will look from the outside. If the film is applied on tinted glass, that often reduces the shiny appearance of a film with a exterior reflectance.

Indicators of Insulation

 

-U-Value (Summer) a measure of heat loss. Will be an indication of shielding from outdoor summer conditions. Because U-value measurement is based on the temperature difference between outdoor and indoor temperatures, summer U-Value is based on a smaller temperature difference than winter U-value.

-U-Value (Winter) a measure of heat loss. Will be an indication of blocking the .loss of heat through the window to the outside. Because U-value measurement is based on the temperature difference between outdoor and indoor temperatures, winter U-Value is based on a greater temperature difference than summer U-Value.

Indicators of Heat Rejection

 

Why is Reflectance Better?

– After energy is absorbed Into the window, it eventually leaves the window to the cooler side of the glass.

Using Performance Data

Measure Heat Transmrttance Absorptance Reflectance Visible Light Transmrttance* Absorptance* Reflectance* Emissivrtty Summer U-Value Wnter U-Value Shading Coefficient Solar Heat Gain Coefficient Ultraviolet Light transmission Total Solar Energy Rejection (TSER)  Heat though the window

Heat absorbed by the window

Heat reflected away from window

More light through the window

Block view thmughfrie window

Reduce glare

Ability to keep heat in (winter)

Heat loss through a material

hleat loss through a material

Heat ccMTing in window

Heat coming in window

UV into the room

Heat kept out at the window

Better

Lower

Lower

Higher

Higher

Higher

Lower

Higher

Higher

Lower

Higher

Lower

Lover

Lower

Lower

Lower

Lover

Higher

 


Problem: Solar Heat Gain

– with Low SHGC

Problem: Energy Costs

– Heating climate: Low E
– Cooling climate:
– Low SHGC

– When air-conditioning equipment seems insufficient to carry the cooling load the addition of solar film can reduce the load sufficiently to prevent expensive re-engineering.
– In the performance results, look for a film with a low shading coefficient or a low solar heat gain coefficient.
– These numbers are used to determine the energy cost savings with film.

– The best year round energy savings numbers for cold climates will come from a Low-emissivity film.
– Low-e films reflect heat back into the room, keeping it from being conducted through the window.
– For climates with heavy air-conditioning requirements you need Low Solar Heat Gain Numbers
– Absorbed heat is accounted for in Solar Heat Gain, making it better indicator of energy savings.

Problem: Glare

– Choose a film with Low VLT

– Strong light from the windows creates considerable glare.
-Glare makes it difficult to see computer screens as well as contributes headaches, squinting and eye discomfort.

– Decreasing the level of contrast between room lighting and strong external light minimizes many of these problems.

Problem: Privacy

– Choose a film with Low VLT and/or High VLR

Problem: One-way Glass

– Select a film with high visible light reflection
– Works when area to be observed has higher light levels than the area where the person observing is

Problem: Ultraviolet Light

– All Tint Depot block almost all UV energy
– Choose any of them to block the harmful effects of UV light on skin

 

Problem: Fading

– Choose a film with
– High TSER

– Solar energy alone does not cause fading.
– Fabric dyes decompose from heat and humidity over time.
– Cleaning fluids, low quality fabric dyes, certain colors or the very combination of the dye and fabric will affect fading.

Problem: Building Appearance

– Choose a film that brings out p| the best in your

 

– Film with a high Visible Light Transmission (%T) provides protection against ultraviolet light and some solar protection while doing little to alter the appearance.

Electromagnetic interference

– Decreases unwanted electromagnetic signals
– Contains electromagnetic signals
– Minimizes interception of confidential data

 

– To exclude or decrease unwanted electromagnetic radiation or signals
– To contain electromagnetic signals which can disrupt neighboring equipment such as a computer
– To minimize the opportunity for interception of confidential data

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